It is currently 22 Aug 2017, 12:41

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Help for Translation
PostPosted: 19 May 2008, 19:42  
F1 Driver
User avatar

Joined: 07 Oct 2007, 21:13
Posts: 2476
Location: Istanbul
Country: Turkey (tr)
Hi everybody,

As you may know, I work as a translator. Now, I've been translating a book to Turkish. The name of the book "My Sister Jodie" written by English writer Jacqueline Wilson. It's a children's book. I sometimes come across some fundamental issues totally spesific to Britian, which I couldn't find the exact meaning and functions on the Internet. So, can you please help me on those matters?

For example, I have to translate those two written below into Turkish. I searched them on the Internet, found something but I would like to know the exact way of usage in everyday life in Britian.

Common Entrance Exam and
General Certificate of Secondary Education.

Can you please say someting about them?

_________________
"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it by not dying" -Woody Allen


Last edited by Ali on 25 Sep 2008, 10:51, edited 1 time in total.
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Orkut Share on Digg Share on MySpace Share on Delicious Share on Technorati 
 Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Help for Translation - Especially from Britian
PostPosted: 19 May 2008, 19:59  
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2007, 17:32
Posts: 25503
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
The General Certificate of Secondary Education is currently what I'm doing- it is a two year course where yo study subjects- in my case the 3 sciences (Biology, Chemistry nd Physics), Maths, English, French, Religious Studies and 3 others of your own choice) and at the end do exams. You do these at the age of 15 or 16 and through either an exam or coursework:

most stuff from wikipedia:

List of GCSE subjects
Note: Many of the subjects in this list are not offered by every school. Also note that subjects which are extremely rare, such as minor languages or subjects taught by only one or two schools, are not listed below.


Effectively compulsory subjects
English
Many schools also insist on students taking GCSE English Literature
Mathematics
Science (students can take a number of different 'routes'):
GCSE Science (which includes elements of biology, chemistry, and physics)
GCSE Science and GCSE Additional Science (a more academic course)
GCSE Science and GCSE Applied Science (a more vocational course)
GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry and GCSE Physics individually
Welsh or Welsh Second Language (in schools in Wales)

Languages
Modern Foreign Languages
Arabic
Bengali
Chinese (Cantonese or Mandarin)
Dutch
French
German
Modern Greek
Gujarati
Modern Hebrew
Hindi
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Japanese
Maltese
Persian
Polish
Portuguese
Punjabi
Russian
Spanish
Turkish
Urdu
Welsh
Classical Languages
Ancient Greek
Biblical Hebrew
Latin

Technology
Design and Technology
CAD / CAM
Electronics
Engineering and Manufacturing (Double Award)
Food Technology
Graphic Products
Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
Applied ICT (Double Award)
Product Design
Electronics with Resistant Materials
Resistant Materials
Systems and Control Technology
Textiles

Humanities
Classical Civilisation
Economics
Buddhism
Geography
Geology
History
Modern World
Economic and Social
School's History Project
Hinduism
Humanities
Islam
Judaism
Philosophy & Ethics
Religious Studies
Sikhism

People and society-related subjects
Citizenship (PSE)
Health and Social Care (double award)
Home Economics: Child Development
Home Economics: Food and Nutrition
Law
Psychology
Social Science
Sociology

Expressive arts
Applied Art and Design (double award)
Art and Design
Art: Fine Art
Art: Graphics
Art: Textiles
Ceramics
Dance
Design
Drama
Expressive Arts
Fashion Design
Graphics
Film Studies
Media Studies
Moving Arts
Music
Photography
Sculpture

Others
Additional Mathematics[6]
Applied Business (double award)
Archaeology
Astronomy
Business Studies
Business and Communication Systems
General Studies
Human Biology
Human Physiology and Health
Nautical Studies
Outdoor Pursuits
Physical Education (PE)
Rural and Agricultural Science
Sports Studies
Food technology
Statistics


full detail:
GCSE courses are taken in a variety of subjects, which are usually decided by the students themselves in Year 9 (age 13-14). Study of chosen subjects begins at the start of Year 10 (age 14-15), and final examinations are then taken at the end of Year 11 (age 15-16).

GCSEs are not compulsory, but they are by far the most common qualification taken by 14-16-year-old students. The only requirement is that in state schools English, Mathematics, Science, Religious Education and Physical Education are studied during Key Stage 4 (the GCSE years of school); in England, some form of ICT and citizenship must be studied and, in Wales, Welsh must be studied. In private schools and home educators not following the national curriculum these subjects do not have to be taught for any examination (or even be discrete lessons), though it is normal for at least English, Mathematics and Science to be studied to GCSE level.

For the reasons above, virtually all candidates take GCSEs in English, Mathematics and Science. In addition, many schools also require that students take English Literature, at least one Modern Foreign Language, at least one Design and Technology subject, Religious Education, (often a short, or 'half', course) and ICT (though increasingly this is the DiDA or OCR National, rather than the GCSE). Students can then fill the remainder of their timetable (normally totalling nine different subjects) with their own choice of subjects (see list below). Short Course GCSEs (worth half a regular GCSE) or other qualifications, such as BTECs, can also be taken.

At the end of the two-year GCSE course, each student receives a grade for each subject. The pass grades, from best to worst, are:

A* (pronounced 'A-star')
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Those who fail a course are given a U (unclassified) and the subject is not included on their certificates. Receiving five or more A*-C grades is often a requirement for taking A-levels in the school sixth form, at a sixth form college or at a further education college after leaving secondary school. Where the choice of A level is a subject taken at GCSE level, it is frequently required that the student has received a GCSE C grade; in the case of mathematics, a minimum of a B grade is often preferred. Most universities typically require a C or better in English and Mathematics, regardless of a student's performance in their A-level or Foundation Degree course after leaving school. Many students who fail to get a C in English and Mathematics (and, increasingly, ICT) will retake their GCSEs in those subjects at a later date.

GCSEs are part of the National Qualifications Framework. A GCSE at grades D-G is a Level 1 qualification, while a GCSE at grades A*-C is a Level 2 qualification.

In most subjects, one or more coursework assignments may also be completed. Coursework can contribute to anything from 20-80% of a student's final grade, with more practical subjects, such as design and technology and music, often having a heavier coursework element. The rest of a student's grade (normally the majority) is determined by their performance in examinations. These exams may either be terminal exams at the end of Year 11, a series of modular examinations taken throughout the course, or a combination of the two. Students can sometimes resit modular examinations later in the course and attempt to improve their grade.

In many subjects, there are two different 'tiers' of examination offered: higher, where students can achieve grades A*-D, and foundation, where they can achieve grades C-G. If a candidate fails to obtain a G on the foundation tier or a D on the higher tier they will fail the course and receive a U (though there is a safety net allowing those who narrowly miss a D on the higher tier to receive an E). In non-tiered subjects, the examination paper allows candidates to achieve any grade. Coursework also always allows candidates to achieve any grade. In 2006, GCSE Mathematics changed from a 3-tier system (foundation D-G, intermediate B-E, and higher A*-C) into the standard 2-tier system (foundation C-G and higher A*-D).

Some subjects, such as science, can be split up into several different subjects: it is possible to be examined on science as a single or double GCSE, or with biology, chemistry, and physics separately (where three GCSEs are awarded, one for each science).

There are now five examination boards offering GCSEs: AQA, OCR, Edexcel, the WJEC and the CCEA; while all boards are regulated by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) - a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) - the boards are self-sufficient organisations. Traditionally, there were a larger number of regional exam boards, but changes in legislation allowed schools to use any board before a series of mergers reduced the number to five. The Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) acts as a single voice for the Awarding Bodies, and assists them to create common standards, regulations and guidance.

Students receive the results of their GCSEs in the fourth week of August (In my case Aug 2009) The CCEA publish their results on the Tuesday and the other examination boards publish theirs on the Thursday. Normally, students have to go to their school to collect their results.


In my case my options are History (mostly 20th century eg. Nazis through to the cold war), Geography and Latin

Does that help?

_________________
F1Zone.net News
 Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Help for Translation - Especially from Britian
PostPosted: 19 May 2008, 20:08  
F1 Driver
User avatar

Joined: 07 Oct 2007, 21:13
Posts: 2476
Location: Istanbul
Country: Turkey (tr)
phil1993 wrote:
The General Certificate of Secondary Education is currently what I'm doing- it is a two year course where yo study subjects- in my case the 3 sciences (Biology, Chemistry nd Physics), Maths, English, French, Religious Studies and 3 others of your own choice) and at the end do exams. You do these at the age of 15 or 16 and through either an exam or coursework:

most stuff from wikipedia:

Thank you for your help. I actullay read from Wikipedia but I wanted to know how important it is in your daily life or school life. What is your parents' approach? Do they force you to pass? What happens if you fail? Do you feel pressure due to the exams?

As you may infer, I need some "human"ish side, not the content instead.

_________________
"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it by not dying" -Woody Allen
 Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Help for Translation - Especially from Britian
PostPosted: 19 May 2008, 20:14  
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2007, 17:32
Posts: 25503
Country: United Kingdom (uk)
um, well, they are very important- i'm halfway through the 2 year course. my parents just want me to try my best but the teachers want you to all get an A* in all 10 (i think) subjects, so yes there is quite a lot of pressure, but we generally joke about through most lessons. if you fail then its you're own fault and it will sit on your CV for the rest of your life- it may depend whether you earn £200,000 p.a or £20,000 p.a. i do a GCSE in all lessons but in sports- so they are very predominant in lessons.

_________________
F1Zone.net News
 Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Help for Translation - Especially from Britian
PostPosted: 19 May 2008, 20:21  
F1 Driver
User avatar

Joined: 07 Oct 2007, 21:13
Posts: 2476
Location: Istanbul
Country: Turkey (tr)
phil1993 wrote:
um, well, they are very important- i'm halfway through the 2 year course. my parents just want me to try my best but the teachers want you to all get an A* in all 10 (i think) subjects, so yes there is quite a lot of pressure, but we generally joke about through most lessons. if you fail then its you're own fault and it will sit on your CV for the rest of your life- it may depend whether you earn £200,000 p.a or £20,000 p.a. i do a GCSE in all lessons but in sports- so they are very predominant in lessons.

Oh yes, quite clear. Thank you very much. Wish you best :thumbsup:

_________________
"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it by not dying" -Woody Allen
 Offline Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
Jump to:  
cron

F1Zone.net is proudly powered by phpBB